A Celebration of Death? – Response to the Death of Osama Bin Laden

A Twitter Milestone
We Are Designed by God to Create, Build and Accomplish

The announcement of the death of Osama Bin Laden reminded me of a post originally published in February of this year. I have taken the text from that post and added additional comments below.

February 2, 2011:

ColosseumAs we toured the Colosseum  in Rome, the guide  described the events that were staged in that structure over a four hundred year period. There were gladiatorial battles, men hunting animals, animals hunting men, executions and other grisly displays. Each spectacle ended only when one side in the battle was killed or rendered unable to continue fighting.

Our guide made a special point about the fact that they would put sand on the wood floors to allow the competitors and victims to have traction in the midst of the blood that would inevitably flow.

In the 21st Century, we can easily feel superior to these Romans who sat and applauded such waste of human and animal life. We wonder how civilized people could enjoy such entertainment.

Upon further reflection, however, I have to come to grips with the fact that there are many movies and television shows that are just as graphic and grisly as the entertainment in the Colosseum. The fact that real blood is not being shed does not make the acts displayed any less despicable.

What does it say about a society when death and violence are seen as entertaining? What does it say about us as individuals when we can watch graphic violence (even if it is only special effects) and derive pleasure from it?

I’m asking these questions of myself and sharing them with you as food for thought as we consider what is healthy and appropriate for entertainment. Before we condemn the ancient Romans, we should be honest about how much we are like them.

May 2, 2011 Update:

Yesterday it was announced that Osama Bin Laden was killed. Should Christians rejoice in this? I don’t think we should.

Perhaps there should be a sense of relief that a man who pursued evil has been prevented from inflicting further harm. Romans 13:1-7 tells us that governments have been put in place by God to restrain evil. Osama will no longer be a threat and this is a relief.

Yet, I cannot find any evidence in Scripture that there should be rejoicing in this. Ezekiel 33:11 tells us that God does not rejoice when a wicked man dies, neither should we.

Jesus tells us in Matthew 5:4 that those who mourn will be blessed. Today we should mourn that this death was necessary. We should mourn the evil that that made this death necessary. We should mourn that others will follow in Osama’s footsteps.We should mourn that the tendency toward evil is present in our own hearts.

Yet in our mourning, we should remember that God is in control and is moving events toward his ends in his time. One day all will be set right. Then we will rejoice.

 

A Twitter Milestone
We Are Designed by God to Create, Build and Accomplish
About Mark McIntyre

A follower of Jesus Christ who shares observations about how Scripture should impact the church and the world. Mark is the original author and editor of Attempts at Honesty.

3 comments
Scott Kelly
Scott Kelly

I couldn't help thinking about Proverbs 24:17-18, "Do not rejoice when your enemy falls, And do not let your heart be glad when he stumbles; Lest the LORD see it, and it displease Him, And He turn away His wrath from him." The reference to Ezek 33:11 is also important to remember. I am not impressed with murder, even if it is of an enemy. I felt very uneasy last night watching all the drunken revelry at the whitehouse and at ground zero in celebration of one more lost soul (probably) going to hell. Can we really feel safer now that a threat is removed when ultimately God allows or prevents terrorism to take place? Don't misunderstand me: I'm not saying God CAUSES terrorism, but certainly He is in control of all world events as much as He wants to be. My hope is in Jesus Christ, not our military prowess. Given the state of moral decay in this country, I am scared of what judgement God will allow against us. The celebratory atmosphere around me seems foolish and speaks directly to the same sin nature that propelled the grisly colosseum spectacles. I am saddened by this fallen world. I am saddened by my own sin. I want to go home.

R.B. Pray
R.B. Pray

I agree. I have seen a number of people post about how he will spend his eternal time w/ the likes of Dahmer, Hitler etc... Let us remember that Jesus weeps over these lost souls, and if I have my facts straight, Dahmer is in Heaven. He gave his life to the Lord while in prison.

Craig
Craig

I think for the most part today's society is overwhelmed by the "celebration" of death. Our most popular sport; American Football" is the most violent team sport there is. Then we have Ultimate Cage Fighting and of course there is always the "they go to the races to see the accidents". My real concern is that our young people seemed consumed with the resignation that they will die young and there is nothing to live for.

R.B. Pray
R.B. Pray

I agree. I have seen a number of people post about how he will spend his eternal time w/ the likes of Dahmer, Hitler etc... Let us remember that Jesus weeps over these lost souls, and if I have my facts straight, Dahmer is in Heaven. He gave his life to the Lord while in prison.

Scott Kelly
Scott Kelly

I couldn't help thinking about Proverbs 24:17-18, "Do not rejoice when your enemy falls, And do not let your heart be glad when he stumbles; Lest the LORD see it, and it displease Him, And He turn away His wrath from him." The reference to Ezek 33:11 is also important to remember. I am not impressed with murder, even if it is of an enemy. I felt very uneasy last night watching all the drunken revelry at the whitehouse and at ground zero in celebration of one more lost soul (probably) going to hell. Can we really feel safer now that a threat is removed when ultimately God allows or prevents terrorism to take place? Don't misunderstand me: I'm not saying God CAUSES terrorism, but certainly He is in control of all world events as much as He wants to be. My hope is in Jesus Christ, not our military prowess. Given the state of moral decay in this country, I am scared of what judgement God will allow against us. The celebratory atmosphere around me seems foolish and speaks directly to the same sin nature that propelled the grisly colosseum spectacles. I am saddened by this fallen world. I am saddened by my own sin. I want to go home.